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20131028
20131105
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
edward snowden may have information about how much cooperation european governments gave to the surveillance. >> as they wrap up meetings on capitol hill, what are they saying after the first meeting emerges. >> reporter: this is part of an european inquiry set up a few months ago. this has been long planned. the first stop at chairman of the house intelligence mike rogers who said he didn't understand what all the fuss was about, that they should be glad europe is spying on them because its keeping them safe. not much there. there is talk of ongoing dialogue but the chairman of european union foreign affairs has said confidence has been damaged. >> has anything been said that their spying headquarters have been linked so they can share the spy information. >> reporter: that's the big question, what we haven't learned from the edward snowden is the amount of cooperation from the european governments and the national security agency. this is something that they have been very concerned about. as far as world leaders who are talking about things, angela merkel and so on, yo
tapper when he interviewed him earlier this week. tapper asked him about edward snowden. i want to play what he said. >> the problem with snowden is he had access to classified information. he violated conditions under which they got those. he's a traitor, pure and simple. and i don't think you can judge him any other way. there's some people who say he's a whistle-blower. he's talked about methods and ways we collect intelligence. >> a number of people said and come around and changed their opinion but clearly vice president cheney has not, doesn't sound like he's going to. how do you respond to what he said? >> i'm really glad dick cheney is available to speak on this because i think he under scores the most important point. dick cheney engaged in some of the worst, most radical conduct in the last century in the united states and did it all in secret from lying about the war in iraq, to torturing people, to putting people in cages with no lawyers. to eavesdropping of the american people without the warrants required by law. people in political power like dick cheney want to do what t
. >>> and edward snowden says british counterparts to the nsa are some of the worst offenders to government oversight. >>> welcome to "around the world." police came within minutes of stopping the alleged l.a.x. shooter from heading to the airport before friday's rampage. one. new details we're learning today. this is from an exclusive interview with a woman who knows the suspect and his three roommates. 23-year-old paul ciancia is charged with murdering a tsa officer. ciancia is in critical condition after being shot by police officers. the fbi says he set out to kill tsa employees, and now a woman who knows the suspect tells our miguel marquez, that one roommate, who had no idea what was going on, even drove him to the airport. >> he asked one of the roommates if he could have a ride to the airport. >> why did he need a ride? >> he said he was going back home. either that his dad was kind of sick and he had to deal with some family issues. >> did anyone ever see a ticket? >> no. >> he did mention what day. that morning, he doesn't knock and says, i need to leave. can you take me now. >> d
interview that the leaks by edward snowden have done is make the united states rethink how we spy on our allies and how the nsa is controlled. >> should we assume from that answer, sir, that you did or would know if actually that was happening? >> jim, as i said, i'm not here to talk about classified information. what i am confirming is the fact that we're undergoing a complete review of how intelligence -- there are very strict laws governing what we do internally. >> right. >> internationally, there are less constraints on how our intelligence teams operates. what i have said is that it's important for us to insure as technology develops and expands, that are reflective of our values. >> questions also emerge this past week about how much the president knew about the troubled website that was america's porthole to obama care. the website that came online and then offline. >> this is unacceptable. it needs to be fixed. >> of course the administration keeps pointing out that the fate of obama care does not rest solely on its website. today the president responded to the possibility that
.s. surveillance abroad. the material handed over to a reporter by nsa leaker edward snowden and it's providing a seemingly endless stream of revelations. those revelations are rocking america's relationships with some of its closest allies. christiane amanpour is joining us right now. you just spoke to the reporter who has been breaking all of these edward snowden leaks. what did he just tell you? >> reporter: well, first of all, they have thousands and thousands of documents but also, that he just simply rejects what, for instance, mike rogers, chairman of the house intelligence committee, british prime minister david cameron, many, many u.s. and other allied officials are saying, which is that this is dangerous, what they're doing, that they are putting all sorts of people at risk, they are compromising all sorts of abilities to close down terrorist cells and plots and this and that. he rejects that and always has. this is what he said to me on that. >> every terrorist who is capable of tying their own shoes has long known that the u.s. government and the uk government are trying to monitor
with the former vice president dick cheney. cheney says edward snowden is "a traitor." plain and simple. my asthma's under control. i don't miss out... you sat out most of our game yesterday! asthma doesn't affect my job... you were out sick last week. my asthma doesn't bother my family... you coughed all through our date night! i hardly use my rescue inhaler at all. what did you say? how about - every day? coping with asthma isn't controlling it. test your level of control at asthma.com, then talk to your doctor. there may be more you could do for your asthma. for those nights when it's more than a bad dream, be ready. for the times you need to double-check the temperature on the thermometer, be ready. for high fever, nothing works faster or lasts longer. be ready with children's motrin. ♪ [ male announcer ] eeny, meeny, miny, go. ♪ ♪ more adventures await in the new seven-passenger lexus gx. lease the 2014 gx 460 for $499 a month for 27 months. see your lexus dealer. for $499 a month for 27 months. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. on
released by edward snowden and said a few things about it. one, not the nsa listening in on this call data. it was the nsa, the u.s. and all of its nato partners. the cold data had nothing do with the spanish and french but a collection of call data listen -- listen to it in a number of countries in support of military operations. he said it is completely false. one, this was the msa doing this and, two, it was european citizens, french, and spanish citizens that were being listened to. pretty aggressive knockdown of that story and some of the source of some of the greatest criticism from european side of nsa surveillance. >> jim, part of the white house pushback has been everybody does it. clapper also saying that foreign countries also spy on the u.s. so -- looking at that further, is it possible that the president's blackberry is being read by the germans or the british? >> i asked this of a former official yesterday. i was being -- he said, sure. they probably go after it. i don't know if they would have success. nsa has advantages. but one of the points that mike rogers made in this h
closest allies. the newest edward snowden documents reveal more spying on america's closest allies. spain reports the nsa listened in on 60 million phone calls in a single month. in germany, the newspaper records, president obama was briefed by nsa chief keith alexander about spying on angela merkel's calls. the nsa quickly denied the report telling cnn general sander did not discuss with president obama in 2010 an alleged foreign intelligence operation involving german chancellor merkel, nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving murkle. the nsa says the willingness up to now to deny present and future monitoring. >> i can tell you the president can assure the chancellor, the sungs not and will not 3407b tore the conversations of the chancellor. >> reporter: they are coming to the u.s. to challenge their american counterparts, after breaking quote german law on german soil. house chairman rodgers defended the nsa under surveillance on cnn sunday saying it was both well regulated and essential to keeping both americans and europeans safe from terrorism. >> i think the biggest
by contractor edward snowden. this comes amid the political fire storm over whether president obama was informed that the german prime minister's phone calls were wiretapped. >> giving any document at all about any world leader, the person briefing him or the briefing bookie would have to say where it came from, especially since it's so controversial, so sensitive, i should say. to no. i can't believe as commander in chief, as president of the united states that if this was being done that he didn't know about it. >> and others, democratic operatives, say there's every reason to believe the president did know that there was this danger and this is why he gave up his blackberry. >> when the private gave up his blackberry the day he became president and he was upset he had to give it up, why? because other countries would be listening in on it. the real miracle or stunning thing to me is that the british purchase thought she could talk to a cell phone and no one would be listening to her, allies or foes would be listening in on her conversations. of course we were. >> how does the n.s.a. respond t
on edward snowden, the nsa leaker. they are accusing the contractor of billing the government for background checks that it knew were incomplete. >>> officials say five more people are in custody in connection with the deadly terrorist attack on the west gate mall last month. 11 other people are already being held. at least 67 were killed after gunmen stormed the shopping center. >>> the south african olympic runner is facing new charges in the death of his girlfriend. with murder, two gun charges are being added. business store -- business storeus business storious but cl. >>> anderson, look at what happened in milwaukee as a police cruiser is chasing a speeding car. you see there, it swerves off a highway ramp and smashes into a barrier and goes airborne. the driver and the officer were injured. they will be okay. the driver is charged with dui. >> incredible video. amazing. >>> a horrifying story in california. 14 early patients abandoned when the nursing home shut down instead of being moved to a new facility, they were left behind where nearly all of the staff walked out. and a big name
own allies, some of the documents posted by or leaked by edward snowden to the media indicate these programs started in 2002. why spy on an ally? >> jake, if there were such a program, it would be classified. i couldn't talk about it. it would be totally inappropriate. i haven't been in the loop obviously for more than four years. so it's just one of those subjects i couldn't discuss. >> without getting specific, on a theoretical basis, what is the interest of the united states in conducting surveilance on a country or a leader who is a clear ally of the united states? >> i've got to go with the answer i've given you. let me say this. we do have a fantastic intelligence capability worldwide against all kinds of potential issues and concerns. we are vulnerable as was shown on 9/11. and you never know what you're going to need when you need it. the fact is we do collect a lot of intelligence. without speaking of any particular target or group of targets that intelligence capability is enormously important to the united states to our conduct of foreign policy, to the defense matt
by edward snowden. and that slide showing she is numbers in millions and so on. but in fact, the nsa collected no information in europe. they say that any information, any of this metadata, that's what it was just metadata. not phone calls or content. was done by european intelligence services not by the nsa. and that in fact it was nof of citizens of those countries, france and spain, but collected from a number of sources by the u.s. and nato allies in support of military operations abroad. here's how they made that case at the hearings today. >> assertions by reporters in france, lemond, spain, el mundo, italy espresso that new york sa collected millions of phone calls are completely false. to be perfectly clear, this is not information that we collected on european citizens. it represents information that we and our nato allies have collected in defense of our countries and in support of military operations. >> so in effect they're saying there that one of the strongest reasons for this anger we've been seeing from europe started with nothing, the misinterpretation, erin, of a si
accounts much the leaker behind all of these is edward snowden hiding out in russia and the journalist who helped bring it to the world's attention is glen greenwald who spoke with me said that the president has not been honest with the american people. listen. >> i think he was informed but chose to tell the public things that he knew to be false. this is really been the nub of the story from the very beginning is top nsa officials lied to the congress about what nsa does with america's communication. and president obama has repeatedly mislead the public by claiming that the nsa does not invade the content of our communications when in fact without warrants the nsa is frequently monitoring the communication of american citizens. >> not everyone sees it this way. joining me now from los angeles, fox news contributor, rick grenell the former spokesman to the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. rick, thanks for joining us. i interviewed glen greenwald. the reason we brought him on cashing in which i'm going to air it tomorrow morning on the fox news channel. the reason why i brought him on is becaus
's been talked about edward snowden getting clemency. he has asked for that. should he get clemency? >> no. he's not getting clemency. the fact he broke the law, he stole classified material. what i ask the question is, who has been fired at the nsa for being so sloppy, so negligent to allow a 29-year-old to allow a 29-year-old to walk away with highly classified material? nobody has to my knowledge. >> important question. senator leahy, thank you so much for your time this afternoon. we appreciate it. >>> coming up, big news at the supreme court. nbc news justice correspondent pete williams joins me next. stay with us. you're giving away pie? would you like apple or cherry? cherry. oil...or cream? definitely cream. [ male announcer ] never made with hydrogenated oil. oh, yeah. [ male announcer ] always made with real cream. the sound of reddi wip is the sound of joy. see who does good work and compare costs. it doesn't usually work that way with health care. but with unitedhealthcare, i get information on quality rated doctors, treatment options and estimates for how much i'll pay. that h
that nsa leaker edward snowden could be granted clemency. i want to bring in benjamin carden. senator carden, glad to have you here, sir. >> alex, good to be with you. >> edward snowden released what he called this manifesto for the truth. he says current debates about spying just prove his revelations are helping bring about change. what's your response to that? >> mr. snowden has caused real damage to this country. the manner in which he has conducted these releases have compromised our national security. as senator feinstein said, there's a way in which a whistleblower can get information to us. we want to make sure there's adequate oversight on the powers of the intelligence community. we need the right balance to keep us safe and protect the rights of americans. so there's concern on how we collect data, but for a person who has been given that access and trust on his own to do this type of release is detrimental to our country. >> sir, as you serve on the senate foreign relations committee, i know you're privy to things we are not necessarily. do you believe what we know so far
't just hire former nsa staffers saying, hey, we have oversight now. edward snowden even. who apparently is making noise about testifying before congress via skype which would be interesting. >> really? all right, greg, we heard some sort of concerns from jim and ross about need for transparency and oversight. what's your reaction? >> oversight failed. that's the bottom line. that's what we learned from the disclosures. all the things carrie talked about, all mechanisms put in place to protect privacy, oversight tailed. -- failed. now we have to figure out a way to reconstruct them. when you sthart to think about how to reconstruct oversight and how to make it work, think about the causes of the failure. one of the big causes of the failure was intelligence officials repeatedly misled congress. they did it at open hearings, and whether it was behind the scenes as well, we don't know, but there was misleading statements. they misled the public about what was going on. they even misled the court that's supposed to be deciding whether they can do what they want to do and what they have. doi
as a victory by people like edward snowden and gl glenn greenwald. >> did you talk to glenn at all? it seems a narrow view when he says is angela merkel a terrorist. you hear from the obama administration side that these intelligence services do a lot more than just only try to intercept communications amongst terrorists. there's a lot more to it. >> right. exactly. a lot of it is about the economic side. a lot of it is, you know, just trying to figure out who's meeting who and what's going on. clearly since 9/11 you and i both know that the emphasis has been on trying to disrupt any kind of plots or plans or conspiracies to commit harm against the united states, either in the u.s. or around the world. and against u.s. allies. so that is why prime minister cameron and other strong u.s. allies have been very robust in their defense of this kind of data collection. we also know that, yes, angela merkel is a strong u.s. ally, but in the past, germany has had, obviously with east germany, it was a communist country, so a lot of spying was done in relation to that. its relations and its trade and
question. this relates to edward snowden and being a contractor for the government. 17% of your employees have some kind of security clearance. >> that's correct. >> that's correct? okay. so what is the lesson of edward snowden in terms of being able to track your employees to make sure there's not more like that if that's -- i mean, there's some people who think he's a hero. i don't want to suggest anything. but given your role as a government contractor of trying to avoid that. and how do you think the government's going to change its relationship with contractors as a result? >> well, a lot of questions there. let me start with this premise. i got my first security clearance when i was 18 years old. i had joined the military, i was in military intelligence. and as a result of that, i signed a document that said i would not disclose the items that i came about. somebody chose -- mr. snowden chose to disclose that and as a consequence, we're in the dialogue that we are in today. our -- the government has been buying services from the private industry since the first world war. there's mi
in the wake of weeks by former nsa contractor edward snowden. >>> a number of comments about janet yellen starting to come from the senate. richard shelby says he would oppose efforts to block her nomination with a filibuster unless some disturbing disclosure emerge. his comments come after senator rand paul said he instead to withhold her nomination. and senator lindsay graham has vowed an effort to block white house nominees until the obama administration comes forward with more information about benghazi. shelby's comments are important because democrats would need to pick up only five republicans vote to clear procedural hurdles and bring yellen's nomination to a full senate vote. yellen's nomination needs only a simple majority. joining us this morning from washington is eamon afterers. this is getting back to some tense times in the senate when it comes to these nominations. we thought we had averted these issues. >> mccain threatening to pu put a whole here on janet yellen in the united states. they wanted to see more of these documents related to ben fwazzy. they wanted to see the
you had the wiki leaks, private manning, and now you have edward snowden who has ansed and international -- international uproar. there are young people who have other ideas and they are willing to take the risk of putting them out. it is an interesting and relatively new development that makes it hard. some secrets should be kept, but it is a question of degree. it looks as though the nsa was doing too much. they have to do some things, obviously. there has to be a balance between security and freedom. could live in a police state where the government knew everything. there has to be a balance between what the government freedom do and our own and civil liberties and rights. they happen to be guerin teed in a thing called the constitution of the united states. host: is glenn greenwald a journalist or an activist? erie: you have to ask him it i think he is a little bit of both. host: why do you say that? guest: he made no secret that he has a point of view. that means he is an activist. he was also writing for "the guardian." papers a liberal, leftish which has done som
of all the questions that have been raised in this includes that of edward snowden and what should give us any faith in this current history. >> i appreciate the question. and i certainly understand it based upon the reports and as you mentioned, senator, he contained very serious allegations of contract fraud arising out of 2010 and 2011 and we have been aware of these allegations since the complaint was filed in july 2011 and have been working closely with the doj to implement changes that would address this nature would not continue in this includes what the allegations could be. we understand that the contractors have an obligation to conduct their own investigations. in this includes our own quality reviews of the investigations and what the allegation is here is to move cases more quickly and that is a real problem, obviously with the allegations that are substantiated because this includes quality review and it's a real problem because we rely upon their quality reviews in order for us to be able to move the investigation along more quickly and we like them to capture the issue a
were talking about is how remarkable it would be that edward snowden might have known about this and barack obama didn't. then the other thing that strikes me is, you know, obviously i under that these programs are very controversial but the amount of controversy over this program is a little bit higher it seems than when we found out they were collecting bulk data on regular citizens. diane feinstein the chairman of the senate intelligence committee is outraged over this disclosure but fine with the other ones. >> what's worse to express, mike barnacle, that i think it's many world leaders that have this happen to them not just angela merkel and i wonder if that should have come out or if that creates more of a firestorm. but, again, it's not george w. bush sitting there with his head phones on listening to angela merkel's conversations, or president obama, it's very different. mike? >> but, mike, if the president knows, if he's getting this intel and if these reports are right that the white house and the state department signed off on it he knows without sitting there wi
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)